As part of DOORS OPEN Pittsburgh, an annual two-day event that provides unprecedented access to buildings around the city, we are featuring nine of the many buildings participating.

Today’s building is Eighth and Penn.

A Brief History of Eighth and Penn

The luxury apartment building consists of two historic buildings at 711 and 713 Penn Ave. The McNally and Bonn Buildings have been fixtures in Pittsburgh for over 100 years. They are turn-of-the-century masonry buildings and are rich with history.

Eighth and Penn

The luxury apartment building consists of two historic buildings at 711 and 713 Penn Ave. The McNally and Bonn Buildings have been fixtures in Pittsburgh for over 100 years. They are turn-of-the-century masonry buildings and are rich with history.

Since their beginning, the storefronts of the buildings have been beautifully restored, as well as the interiors. Around 150 years ago, Eighth Street was previously known as Hancock Street. The block Eighth and Penn is on housed a Methodist church. The church occupied a small campus of a women’s college. Downtown Pittsburgh still had many who walked to work, shopping and their religious services. Transit soon opened more remote areas of the city and many began to venture further out from downtown. The church was destroyed in a fire in 1891 and decided not to rebuild. Eighth and Penn was then open to commercial development. Three local businessmen opened the McNally, Bonn and Heeren buildings. Over the years, the buildings were home to offices, textile and linen stores, a nightclub on the bottom floor and furniture company.

Eighth and Penn

A Brief History of Eighth and Penn

The luxury apartment building consists of two historic buildings at 711 and 713 Penn Ave. The McNally and Bonn Buildings have been fixtures in Pittsburgh for over 100 years. They are turn-of-the-century masonry buildings and are rich with history.

Since their beginning, the storefronts of the buildings have been beautifully restored, as well as the interiors. Around 150 years ago, Eighth Street was previously known as Hancock Street. The block Eighth and Penn is on housed a Methodist church. The church occupied a small campus of a women’s college. Downtown Pittsburgh still had many who walked to work, shopping and their religious services. Transit soon opened more remote areas of the city and many began to venture further out from downtown. The church was destroyed in a fire in 1891 and decided not to rebuild. Eighth and Penn was then open to commercial development. Three local businessmen opened the McNally, Bonn and Heeren buildings. Over the years, the buildings were home to offices, textile and linen stores, a nightclub on the bottom floor and furniture company.